Monday, April 8, 2013

Tested positive for alcohol include Pepsi Cola, Coca-Cola Classic Light and Coke Zero

Tested positive for alcohol include Pepsi Cola, Coca-Cola Classic Light and Coke Zero


55g of Sugar in 500 ml

Last week, The Nation highlighted the ill effects of Coca Cola, citing various researches that had delved into that aspect. However, the ball does not stop there. By extension, Pepsi and other cola drinks have been found to share the ill effects of Coca Cola.
Similar to Coca Cola, Pepsi carries high amounts of carbohydrates (sugar) in its drinks. The PepsiCo Inc. website states that each 500ml drink contains 55g of sugar, which is the same sugar content as Coke.

Cola drinks and Alcohol

Last week we highlighted the potential spermicidal effects of Coke consumption, in addition to risks of obesity, osteoporosis, tooth decay, and dehydration. The Huffington Post had reported (28.06.2012) that a recent study has revealed that more than half of leading cola soft drink brands contains small traces of alcohol. Researchers from the National Institute of Consumption (INC) in Paris claim to have found low levels of alcohol (around 10mg in every liter) in global Coca-Cola drinks, which is approximately 0.001% of alcohol per liter.

The brands tested positive for alcohol include Pepsi Cola, Coca-Cola Classic Light and Coke Zero.

Cola drinks and cancer?

The Huffington Post also reported that, a separate study warned that the chemical that gives cola-flavoured drinks their caramel colour could increase the risk of cancer,
“The chemical, known as 4-methylimidazole (4-MI), is an additive and has already been reduced in fizzy drinks in the US due to it health hazards – but no such changes has been adopted for the UK or elsewhere in the world.”
Laboratory tests led by the American group Center for Science in the Public Interest, suggest that 4-MI speeds up tumour growth in rats, but is yet to be tested on humans.

Labeling laws in Sri Lanka

In light of these potentially hazardous of Cola drinks it is a pressing need for tough and encompassing labeling laws to be enforced in Sri Lanka, at least as a first step, many authorities and consumer rights activists believe.